Filmed Live Musicals

Scenesaver with Caroline Friedman

August 03, 2020 Season 1 Episode 2
Filmed Live Musicals
Scenesaver with Caroline Friedman
Chapters
Filmed Live Musicals
Scenesaver with Caroline Friedman
Aug 03, 2020 Season 1 Episode 2

Host Luisa Lyons chats with Caroline Friedman, founder of new theatre streaming platform Scenesaver.

Scenesaver is the only website making performances from the world's off-Broadway, off- West End, small theatres and emerging artists accessible to everyone online. It's free to register and watch with 150 shows of all genres from around the world available now. New work is being added all the time. Learn more at www.scenesaver.co.uk, and make sure to follow Scenesaver on Twitter!

Learn more about Filmed Live Musicals at www.filmedlivemusicals.com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. You can also support the site at Patreon.  

Filmed Live Musicals was created by Luisa Lyons. Luisa is an Australian actor, writer, and musician. She holds a Masters in Music Theatre from London's Royal Central School of Speech and Drama and now lives, works, and plays in New York. Learn more at www.luisalyons.com or follow on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook

With thanks to Brian Ziegenhagen for editing!

Show Notes Transcript

Host Luisa Lyons chats with Caroline Friedman, founder of new theatre streaming platform Scenesaver.

Scenesaver is the only website making performances from the world's off-Broadway, off- West End, small theatres and emerging artists accessible to everyone online. It's free to register and watch with 150 shows of all genres from around the world available now. New work is being added all the time. Learn more at www.scenesaver.co.uk, and make sure to follow Scenesaver on Twitter!

Learn more about Filmed Live Musicals at www.filmedlivemusicals.com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter. You can also support the site at Patreon.  

Filmed Live Musicals was created by Luisa Lyons. Luisa is an Australian actor, writer, and musician. She holds a Masters in Music Theatre from London's Royal Central School of Speech and Drama and now lives, works, and plays in New York. Learn more at www.luisalyons.com or follow on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook

With thanks to Brian Ziegenhagen for editing!

Luisa Lyons
Welcome to the Filmed Live Musicals podcast, a podcast about stage musicals that have been legally filmed and publicly distributed. The Filmed Live Musicals website contains information on nearly 200 musicals that have been captured live. Check it out at www.filmedlivemusicals.com. And now on with the show.

Welcome to this week's episode of Filmed Live Musicals, the podcast. Our guest this week is Caroline Friedman, the founder of new streaming platform Screensaver, welcome to the podcast Caroline.

Caroline Friedman
Thank you. It's lovely to be here.

Luisa Lyons
It's so lovely to have you here. So can you tell us a bit about why you started Scenesaver.

Caroline Friedman
Well I started Scenesaver for quite a few reasons. It was before locked down, it was last year. And I just felt that every time I went to the theatre, to these tiny theatres -- London has 100 or 100 plus -- I would go there come out and then I would ring up people, friends of mine who your family who couldn't get there to tell them about the show. And I thought this isn't right. And why can't they get to see it somehow, but they couldn't climb a rickety staircase or go down into the cellar. Maybe they couldn't sit for 90 minutes on an uncomfortable bench. It wasn't possible for them to go yet they couldn't see it. And the other thing that struck me was that there were all these wonderful, talented performers, absolutely acting their hearts out. And at the end of the run, it all just disappeared. Nothing was left. And for many of these performers, they were going back to doing jobs, working in shops and just doing anything to make a bit of money, because no one was re- employing them. And it just didn't seem right. Why wasn't there someone who was showcasing the work so that people who couldn't get out there, not just because of disability, it could be child commitments, money, you can't afford to go. Geography if you're living somewhere miles away from the theatre, how do you get there? Loads of reasons, work commitments. That didn't seem fair, it didn't seem fair that there was no one showcasing the work. And also, I felt that these little theatres was so amazing. But I was lucky, because I knew how to find them where they were, and could go to see the performances. And thinking about it, I realized it had to be a way just as Netflix show all of the movies, we could show performance and get it out to new audiences. So that was the idea.

Luisa Lyons
It's such a wonderful idea because it's true as someone that wants to see every single show in existence. It's physically impossible, because there's just as supreme wealth of shows out there, but also accessible issues for people that may not be able to physically, whether because of physical disability or distance, get into a theatre. It's such a wonderful way that the internet and streaming shows online is such a wonderful way to give access to those people.

Caroline Friedman
It's very important. And I did find there was a certain snobbery last year, people were saying things like, Oh, you don't get it. Theatre has to be live. And you know, I do get it. But this is really the next best thing. And also, if I know when I've traveled, I will see wonderful shows, but then I'm missing the things back in the UK. And also, I think that if you live out in the country, and you can't access these shows, the only theatre you're seeing is perhaps amateur dramatic, or just something at a local hall, or maybe you go to a big town and they're just putting on crowd pleasers to make money. And I also found that a lot of people said to me, theatre? Oh, you mean Shakespeare? I said it is nothing like Shakespeare! It's completely different! And it's relevant, it's vibrant. And it's addressing issues because theatre is not just about entertainment. There are mental health things. It's about giving a voice, and also making people think, think about things that they may or may not have, in the past even bother to think about. And it is important, getting them taking on board new ideas, seeing something from somebody else's perspective, these things matter.

Luisa Lyons
And it's tapping into the wealth of creativity that exists beyond the West End and beyond the main towns, as you say that there is this wealth of creativity that deserves to be seen just as much as the big blockbuster titles.

Caroline Friedman
It does. And also, it's in a way a bit depressing that the Broadway or the West End shows that are having famous people. You stick a famous person on the stage, everyone will book it. But that doesn't mean there isn't value to something and all performers have to start somewhere. And so you're seeing new raw talent. And this is why it's exciting. It's varied. You never quite know what you're going to see. And in Scenesaver we've tried to encompass that. We have work from all over the world, all different genres. And we launched in lockdown. And that's been really interesting. We launched because we wanted to give the performers a revenue stream, and we thought we would ask people to be honorable. So we say, had you gone to the theatre, you would have paid for a ticket, so please donate your ticket price, and the honorable ones do it, which is good, and we can give the money to the creatives. We also teamed up with the OnComm Awards, because we wanted to say to people yes, you haven't got a stage but we'll give you a platform. So do keep on creating. And again, this is new work. It's totally different, using zoom, using your phone, but it doesn't mean it isn't good. And we're finding people are enjoying it, which is exciting. And another thing that has really been great is the children's programs. We are very big on a lot of the family sites and loads of children who are at home during lockdown and headed into long holidays are watching us. And again, the kids who don't live in large cities, it's their first time that they are seeing theatre. The first time they're seeing magic, Punch & Judy, which is an old English tradition, and puppetry, all these things that they have never ever encountered. And it's starting to engender a love of theatre from a very early age.

Luisa Lyons
Oh, that's something that it breaks my heart but something I hadn't really thought about that there are kids growing up in this pandemic, who have not yet had the chance to see a live show and that this is going to be their introduction to theatre

Caroline Friedman
And they keep watching it which is lovely, because we use our analytics to see what's going on, because obviously we want people to enjoy it. And that has been so exciting that the children are sitting down. And it's a change. Yes, they're using the computer, but it's so different to cinema, because, and it's also teaching them, it's from an educational perspective that you can develop, you can change, you can see something before your eyes, a man becomes a magician. It's totally different cinema is exciting for them.

Luisa Lyons
And what I love, there's been lots of research done, especially by the National Theatre that shows that people watching live theatre, even on a screen have the same emotional reaction to what they're watching than the people as as to the people who are watching it live. So I think that's it's such a valid way to experience theatre, which leads me to my next question, I want to come back to the snobs that you mentioned earlier, that don't believe that theatre can be on screen. So if theatre, if we go with the Peter Brooks idea that theatre is an event that happens in an empty space and someone, something happens and someone is watching it, how does that change on screen for you or what stays the same?

Caroline Friedman
I think if something is good, you lose yourself in it. And you get and again, it comes back to the fact that it is different to cinema. Because in cinema, if you have something, let's say set up during the war, they can have the extras they can have 100,000 marching armies or what have you, but you can't do that on stage. So you have to be creative. You have to convey it. And it could be to people will create the effect of marching armies. And I think that that is what comes across when you watch it on the screen and you do lose yourself because if the performance is good and we hope that they are. And then you will find that it is a real experience. And it may not be exactly the same as live theatre. But also if you watch something and it's recorded with an audience, you have perhaps your view is slightly restricted that that's what happens in the theatre. So it does work. And it is good. It has, it still has that special magic, if you let yourself go with it. I mean, if you sit there looking for problems, I guess you'll find them. But if you are prepared to say, this is the theatre, this is the show. You will go with it.

Luisa Lyons
Do you think we need a new name or is it a new genre? So we have cinema we have theatre and this is something that's kind of in between? Do you think it's a new, a new genre, a new type of art?

Caroline Friedman
I think it's progressing, obviously technology is. And as you and I just have discussed, it used to be that people just, filming a performance was just sticking a camera there a bit like a home movie. Now it's becoming more and more sophisticated. But I think it will be a great shame if we lose the purity of theatre by saying we're going to adapt, because then you're starting to move into cinema. And that's what this isn't. So you shouldn't be yes, you can use projection. You can use innovation, and sound and video, but if you start to just go away from performance, that's when you lose it. Because the best performance can be two people on empty stage. No props. Nothing. I've seen farces with doors opening and there hasn't been anything on the stage. That was absolutely brilliant performance. You believe that that they're opening the door, that they're running in and out. That's what's so brilliant. But if you were to start saying, right, we've got theatre, we've got performance and video and start putting it in it might lose something.

Luisa Lyons
Yeah, so it's the films are capturing the theatricality is what's important. Yeah. And they are capturing the magic of imagination.

Caroline Friedman
Very much so, so much. And it's interesting because two people can see the same performance, and what strikes them will be totally different. Because obviously, they relate to the performers. They relate to the story and their reactions are so different. One can say something's incredibly sad, and someone else can say it's uplifting. You know, that's what's so great about it. Is it, you can let it take you where you want it to take you. Absolutely.

Luisa Lyons
And you mentioned earlier about sharing profits with the artists. So can you explain a bit about the Scenesaver model that shows that uploaded for free?

Caroline Friedman
Yes, so basically what we wanted to do, because we're into accessibility. The idea is that we wanted to have the shows. When we started out on day one, we had no shows and no users. So in a matter of weeks, and a lot of hard work. Because we're just a shoestring startup. We don't have some massive corporation bankrolling us. It's just me and I have somebody who, Lindsey, who's wonderful, who helps me with social media. And we have Debbie, it's an all female team, actually. And Debbie, who is our web developer, basically, we've just had to slog away at it, and we wanted to get out to as many people and by being inclusive. It wasn't a case of well, if you've got the money, you can enjoy this. So we made a decision. This is going to be a free site. And we felt with lockdown the performers had nowhere to perform. They weren't earning any money and it was only right that we said to people pay the ticket price. Because I think what people forget is that actors may not be working. But it isn't just that they've lost that money. There also is all the money they've invested in future productions. And the other thing that people also forget, because I know talking to friends who aren't in the theatre world, they say, well, two people on the stage it doesn't cost much. And they don't realize that when that person opens the door and they hear the noise of the street behind, but that's got to be payed for, just in the boring admin things, the insurance, all these things, just publicizing it, having someone Front of House, who shows people to their seats? Who's doing the lighting, so you can see this performance. How is it you can hear these performers? So a lot of people that I know in the world and we put a blog on the site asking people from all over the world, what happened to you? I mean one guy, he was sitting in an airport lounge, and his luggage was on the plane. When he got a phone call, the tour through Europe is off. They then had to go to the gate, and you can imagine how they love this when he said it my case off the plane, and they said it's loaded. You can't have it. In Israel, people were actually in the theatre watching shows, when they were told out you go, we've got lockdown, you've got to get out. And so all over the world this was happening, but people were losing not just their income, but their investment. And it was the fact they didn't know when it will ever return to what they expected. And then lots of people lost money they will never get back.

Luisa Lyons
Yeah. Do you set a donation suggestion or is that just the kind of suggested cost of the ticket?

Caroline Friedman
Asking for? Well, I work on the basis that honorable people are honorable, rotten people are rotten. Somebody who'd get, well I thought about it, I thought if we say you get a code and can watch so many views or something, you know, people then hand out code on if they're not honorable. So, but the honorable people, they watch a performance, they enjoy it. And they think, yes, I've seen this. I haven't had to pay the ticket price I haven't had to pay to get there. I haven't had to pay for a babysitter, whatever, you know, so they are prepared to pay. And then we give all of this money to the creatives. So that goes straight over to them.

Luisa Lyons
Has there been an average donation price?

Caroline Friedman
I would say the sweet spot, I should say 100 pounds so everybody.

thing, about 10- 15 pounds sterling is the sweet spot.

Luisa Lyons
It's every little bit adds up. If everyone who's watching the shows, you know if everyone who watched Hamilton paid more than 6.99 or whatever it was to have a Disney subscription. It's, you know that numbers do make a big difference.

Caroline Friedman
And with thousands of subscribers, of users, so obviously, if everybody's honorable, then it helps that and what we do is when they donate, they can say whether it's general donation or to a specific performance, and it goes the performer. That's how it works.

Luisa Lyons
That's extraordinary. And I love, I love that it's also available for free so that people who financially can't afford to would not normally be able to financially afford to go to theatre, it's they're still able to access it.

Caroline Friedman
Yes, which is what we wanted. And because we're all over the world, that also means people can see it at any time and at their convenience. And we have a lot of disabled users. And for them, they can't necessarily sit for a long performance, so they can stop it, and then come back to it. So that also is great. We've had huge feedback on that, which is why now we're making, we're trying to persuade everybody to subtitle their performances and also we are looking at audio describing them so that they are as successful as possible. It's just, it seems bizarre people will spend so much effort on producing a performance. And they will spend money on little things, but it just would not occur to them. Why is it not essential that you subtitle it? Why don't you audio describe it, you lavish all this attention on things, but you don't need to do that. So we're trying to change that. We have blogs showing people how to do it, it's really quite easy. And the idea is everything will be in the end subtitled audio described.

Luisa Lyons
That's fantastic. And I love the idea, the possibility to of sign language coming into it. I know there's there's been kind of an increase of awareness of how to incorporate sign language.

Unknown Speaker
It is a skill. I think people don't realize. It's a bit like audio describing, you don't just want to say what's happening because often the person who is speaking doesn't need the description. But somebody on stage will be reacting. And it's knowing how to convey the fact that somebody is looking aghast or in horror, but you're not disrupting the flow of performance. It's a huge skill. And there are specialists, people who can do it, but we're trying to say to others, look, try and learn this skill and use it for your work.

Luisa Lyons
Yeah, I love that you're making the resources available for for people to learn how to do closed captioning and audio describing I think that's really remarkable.

Caroline Friedman
Especially when they've got the time because while they're at home, when they're not on stage, this is the time when they can look at their work, review it. Because we have new work, we have archived work. Ultimately we want to be the biggest collection of off West End theatre work from all over the world, we have it in different languages. We are in Hebrew and French, Spanish, all different languages. And we are... That's what we want to be, we're trying to say yes to as many people as possible. We do have a few restrictions, it has to be a full performance. We don't do trailers, we don't do excerpts. So it must be a full performance, a professional company. It used to be it had to be performed in a theatre, but of course now because of the lockdown, pandemic, we can't say that, but it must be professional. And of course, anything that is inflammatory won't go on. So we have to, there's the restrictions. But other than that, we try to have all different things. Because if you think about the theatre in New York or London, there are hundreds of productions, you're not going to like every single one. But there's that vast range and you pick and choose.

Luisa Lyons
I love that! You mentioned earlier about the OnComm Awards.

Caroline Friedman
Yes.

Luisa Lyons
C an you speak a little bit more about those?

Caroline Friedman
Yes. Well, the idea of the OnComms, is... I'm an assessor in normal times, I'm the theatre assessor for the off West End awards, which is assessing the work in the theatres in the off West End theatres. But the trouble is, of course, there is no theatre at the moment. And we just thought, it's terrible that people aren't creating. A lot of creatives did actually go into this mourning, they were just so shocked, because they couldn't believe what happened. Then they were stunned. So we wanted to say, look, you can keep on creating, you don't have a conventional stage, but this is your opportunity. So the OnComms are for work created this year. It's for work online, rather than in the theatre. And we're finding that we're getting some incredible things coming on. They're different lengths, people using mobile phones, they're using zoom, all manner of things. And, but it has to be performance. It can't just be a play reading. It has to be where again, you're investing in it. You're putting something in and creating something special, and you're acting, you're not just reading words. And some of the things we have are absolutely fascinating. One girl she lost, you know her wedding was going ahead, it just stopped, of course. So she's done something, developing that theme. We have all different things. And they're very, very popular. And the best ones win OnComm Awards.

Luisa Lyons
And are the OnComm Awards ongoing or is there going to be a date that we can look out for?

Caroline Friedman
Well, these are the OnComms for 2020. We hope that next year there will be live theatre. There should be. We're gradually starting to see it come back. But of course the problem is not just putting on the theatre, it's getting people to go. And in London, as it is in DC, as it is in New York, people don't want to use public transport necessarily. And so how do they get there? And if it's two hours of sitting right next to somebody, they start to worry. So it isn't just a matter of people putting on the shows it's getting the audiences back. So you don't know what will happen. 2021 or we could do it keep them on for online, because there is a skill to recording online.

Luisa Lyons
What do you think makes a good film of theatre?

Caroline Friedman
I think, again, it's if it carries you with it and takes you to somewhere different. And if it makes you think, and I always think a really good performance is one when at the end you just sit there motionless, because it's so amazing. You're almost sorry it's over and you just sit there and think, wow. And you come out and you're still thinking about it, after it's over. Then you know it has got to you, its done something to you.

Luisa Lyons
Absolutely. That's that's the best of theatre, isn't it?

Caroline Friedman
It is, theatre is wonderful.

Luisa Lyons
Transforming.

Caroline Friedman
And I'm sure you think it's been going for millennia. It's going to continue. It may be slightly different. It may be we don't see all the wonderful big musicals just because of the cost. But it will come back because the crux of it is that it's creatives are making it and the clue's in the word, they're creatives.

Luisa Lyons
They, we want to create, that's innate nature and it's human to want to sing and dance.

Caroline Friedman
Maybe this challenge is actually good, because it stops complacency. Because they have got to think outside the box, especially but they've got to get going.

Luisa Lyons
It demands innovation. I wanted to go back to the idea of resistance to filming theatre. And when we were chatting earlier, you mentioned that there were some performers who didn't want their work to be distributed online.

Caroline Friedman
No, and there are still. We have people who contact us and say, yes, we've got some footage, we would love to do it. We just have to persuade one person in the cast who is refusing to do it. And normally, they manage to win them round, but it is some people I think, fear it, which is strange, because if you're, if you give a good performance, you should be proud of it. And again, seems Scenesaver showcases their work.

Luisa Lyons
It only it gives a wider audience.

Caroline Friedman
Yes. Which we touched on is drama students all over the world. English students who think it's all about Shakespeare. They can watch this work and see that it isn't so it is important that it is available and also some of the performances address issues, especially the teenage work. We have worked for teenage audiences that address issues, that maybe the kids can't articulate. They don't want to talk about it to their parents, but if there's issues or their teachers or whatever, but by watching a performance, it can help them get things in order. And give them a bit of confidence. And they can also see it as another way of handling a situation. For example, online grooming, those sorts of things. It's addressing issues, and helping them to have dialogue.

Luisa Lyons
Being able to be seen, like I think about, I wish they would release Everybody's Talking About Jamie, they filmed it in the West End, but because of the film, they're not releasing the filmed live version. And I think of all the people for whom that story would change their lives, seeing themselves on screen.

Caroline Friedman
Yes.

Luisa Lyons
It's so vital. So what would you say to the to the people, to the producers or to the actors who are resistant to put shows online. What would you say to those people to change their minds?

Caroline Friedman
I would first of all say why? And then I might mention the word selfish. But maybe quietly, but it is a bit selfish because what you're basically saying is that only people who live nearby or have the funds or the physicality and can get babysitters and work regular hours, can see the work and why and that's not fair. And I accept you may think that it's not exactly the same, but it really is the next best thing.

Luisa Lyons
That's, I love that so much. I want to put that on a T shirt and I want to show it to every producer in the in the land. Okay, so we're coming to the end of this interview. Thank you so much for being here this week. It's so lovely to talk with you and so exciting and inspiring.

Caroline Friedman
Well, thank you for inviting me. I absolutely delighted. And please do tell people to come on to Scenesaver, the name is S C E N E, scene as in theatre scene, Scenesaver. It's all free. And we look forward to seeing them and I hope they enjoy the work as much as our users are enjoying it. Thank you so much for having me.

Luisa Lyons
It's my pleasure, before we wrap up, I have a few quick rapid fire questions for you. Short answers and whatever first pops into your mind that I will be asking every guest on the show. So what is your favorite musical?

Caroline Friedman
I'm not sure, that's a difficult one isn't it?

Luisa Lyons
It is a tricky one, and I know you've seen a lot.

Caroline Friedman
Yes, there are so many wonderful ones I feel it's a bit like children, you can't choose a favorite! I think I would have to slightly pass on that. Maybe, Parade was wonderful.

Luisa Lyons
Jason Robert Brown.

Caroline Friedman
It's no... That's one of the ones where I went through and the whole audience sat there at the end for five minutes. Nobody moved. Parade is brilliant. But it's not a happy musical, but it is superb. So, Parade is up there.

Luisa Lyons
It's on my wish list to be filmed. When it comes to filmed productions. Do you have a favorite filmed live musical?

Caroline Friedman
I'm not sure I do. And we have so many on Scenesaver I don't think that's a fair question. I don't want to upset anybody.

Luisa Lyons
All of the musicals currently on Scenesaver?

Caroline Friedman
And all the ones that are coming on to Scenesaver.

Luisa Lyons
We touched on this earlier, but I'm going to ask it again. What should we call filmed live theatre?

Caroline Friedman
Well, we call it Scenesaver because that's what it is. It's theatre. It's live theatre filmed. Because it that's what it is, it's not a different thing. It's theatre that's filmed. And as we said, as it's becoming more sophisticated, you are getting that whole theatre experience.

Luisa Lyons
And we didn't touch on this today, but I am curious to ask, what's your stance on bootlegs?

Caroline Friedman
What do you mean by bootlegs?

Luisa Lyons
You know, they we know they exist, that people have filmed theatre productions on their phones or illegally and then they're distributed on the internet.

Caroline Friedman
I'm absolutely against them. Because I don't think anyone has the right to take somebody else's IP and I'm a creative, I make things in metal, and very unusual things and I wouldn't want someone copying my work. And I think it's wrong. You have no right, people have invested, they created and I will not have bootlegs on Scenesaver. It's not right. And I don't think anyone has the right to steal someone's work, whatever it is, you don't copy your design, anything you, you shouldn't do it. So I'm completely against bootlegs, because it's not theirs to do it. And that's what's wrong.

Luisa Lyons
And that's my hope with Filmed Live Musicals, that it legitimizes the company's filming because for so many reasons. That it provides access that you can pay everybody fairly, and that it documents something that's ephemeral, and that's why I'm so excited about Scenesaver because it provides another platform for people to share their work legally.

Caroline Friedman
Yes. And I also think that because the person who has created it, should have the right to actually moderate it, whereas somebody else filming it, is not doing it. And the other thing is, I am, I've been horrified and I've been performances and seen one of the audience holding, an iplayer,

Luisa Lyons
An iPad.

Caroline Friedman
and their phone and recording the whole thing. And actually, when I go to music, concerts or pop concerts, and that, people are no longer dancing because they're holding their phones, and they're desperate to capture it. And they've lost all of the enthusiasm and the energy because they have, and they're missing the sensation because all they're worried about is keeping their phone straight. So but no, I think it's absolutely wrong. No bootlegs I'm afraid.

Luisa Lyons
I couldn't agree with you more. What do you wish had been filmed? What theatre do you wish had been filmed?

Caroline Friedman
I've seen some wonderful plays that have been so exciting. That was one of the fimbriae Zetas shoes. That was brilliant. I've seen some in DC. And what's sad is when they disappeared without trace, and those are the ones that I think need to be kept. Because a whole new generation, and new generations in the future can enjoy them. And it's just gone. And so it is sad that they just disappeared and that's why we're hoping Scenesaver will keep them alive. That's, that's the idea. We're not competing with theatre. We're just trying to open it out to new audiences.

Luisa Lyons
I love it. You're speaking my language. And final question, going forward, what would you like to see filmed.

Caroline Friedman
I would like it to be standard that every theatre has every performance filmed. And it should be filmed in such a way that it conveys the experience as if somebody was sitting in that theatre. And then I would like that film to be seen several versions, the regular one if you like, the one with subtitles, audio described and signed, so that everybody can see it. And the other thing is, subtitles can be in any language now, so that you don't just have to have English speaking film. This is what we've been trying to do. We have for example, Israeli films with English subtitles. We have Spanish films, we want people to be able to see it and enjoy it because otherwise it's a little bit weird that you think only the film, films or plays in your language as the only good ones. Of course they're not. There is wonderful theatre all over the world.

Luisa Lyons
That lifts my heart up. It makes me feel like you know, we're connected as a world and that we can access theatre in Spain or France or Australia or UK, in the US. It's so exciting. It's it makes me feel like we are humanity. Okay, thank you so much. It's been so lovely to meet you today.

Caroline Friedman
It's lovely to meet you. I think it's a wonderful resource because it's exactly the same thing as I'm saying. If you're stuck out somewhere, and you want to film a musical, you're trying to, you know, perform, you're trying to say, look, this is how it can be done. I think it's very interesting if people contrast them. So, you know, two performances of the same musical.

Luisa Lyons
That's my dream is boxsets. You know, I talk about it in terms of Broadway, but like, wouldn't it be amazing if I could have Hello Dolly with Carol Channing and Bette Midler and Pearl Bailey. I want the full set.

Caroline Friedman
So is anyone funding you? Is this just a labor of love?

Luisa Lyons
Labor of love.

Caroline Friedman
Same as me. I mean, I'm hoping we're getting festivals on board and I'm trying to build it up. I really thought the thing was to get it out there. Just that was the thing.

Luisa Lyons
When I was looking through over the weekend, I was amazed how much it's grown since you've started even in such a short time, and the search function is really beautiful. And I loved the accessibility tab that you can change the size of the screen and such I think it's amazing what everything that you're doing.

Caroline Friedman
We're trying to, well this was the thing because I had it all ready last year, but honestly people say now I'm busy and I don't want to do it. And we don't believe it's theatre. And then of course, you know, it's actually come back to sort of bite them. If I had 10 pounds for every person who said to me, I wish I'd recorded it. I wish I'd filmed it. You know, and all their work has gone. Nobody can see it again. And then suddenly realizing other people are earning this money, and they're seeing things. And what if they got show? Nothing? So I think it has changed things going forward.

Luisa Lyons
Yeah, that's kind of been the nice thing about the pandemic is it shifted that attitude toward what film theatre is and what it can be.

Caroline Friedman
Yes, exactly. Well, if I get to New York, or you get to London, who knows where it's I'm supposed to do well, when I'm supposed to be at a wedding in America in a couple of weeks time, but of course, now the bride is just marrying the groom in her parents garden, because no one can come.

Luisa Lyons
Oh, that's heart breaking. The times we are living in... as long as people stay healthy and that's the, you know, will theatre will come back.

Caroline Friedman
You're right. We're starting to get a few that are in the open air. But you've got so many problems now with COVID, haven't you?

Luisa Lyons
Yes, I am not optimistic about theatre reopening in the US, unfortunately, it's not looking good right now.

Caroline Friedman
For us. It was absolutely amazing when they said no panto, because pantomime as you know... The problem is that grandparents buy the tickets for their kids, for their grandchildren. And you say that old people, and you got all these people... And the fact I spoke to the panto organizers and they all said absolutely nothing. In fact what I'm trying to do with Scenesaver is have a couple of Scenesaver pantomimes.

Luisa Lyons
That's wonderful.

Caroline Friedman
And Christmas shows, so that will be good if we can get it.

Luisa Lyons
That's been something fun that I've come across is a lot of pantomimes have been and some shows have been streaming into hospitals and hospice care kind of places and children's hospitals as a way of,

Caroline Friedman
Oh that's interesting we haven't done that in the UK but maybe that's some...

Luisa Lyons
That's in the UK, they're UK productions that are doing that. Stratford East, they did Tommy, and it was streamed into aged care facilities and there've been a few pantones that have streamed, I'm blanking on which ones but they were streamed into St Ormonds...

Caroline Friedman
Stratford did one, a friend of mine recorded it because my background is actually films as well. But no, that will be interesting to see. I'm hoping we're going to get a panto, at least two panomimes. That's the idea.

Luisa Lyons
It's tradition. It's not Christmas unless there's a panto!

Caroline Friedman
Exactly and we've got and it will be a Christmas panto and we've also got a big, it's called Thrive. I don't know if you've heard of it. It's a disabled festival. And we've got that coming on in December, so that should be good.

Luisa Lyons
Oh, that's awesome. How exciting. I can't wait to see. Thank you so much for your time today. I really enjoyed chatting with you.

Caroline Friedman
I've enjoyed it. It's nice to meet a kindred spirit. Take care

Luisa Lyons
Alright, have a good day. Bye. Filmed Live Musicals is a labor of love, and we'd love to thank everyone who makes it possible. Thank you to our patrons Mercedes Esteban, Jesse Rabinowitz and Brenda Goodman, David and Katherine Rabinowitz and Bec Twist for your support. If you'd like to support Filmed Live Musicals, please like and review the podcast or find us on Twitter at musicalsonscreen and on Facebook at Filmed Live Musicals. If you'd like to support the site financially, you can find us at patreon.com/musicalsonscreen. $5 patrons receive early access to written content and $10 patrons also receive early access to this very podcast. Visit www.filmedlivemusicals.com to learn more. Thanks for listening.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai